Because theses are not published in the traditional manner, if you’re using them in your research, you will need to identify them as such in your references. This means that a thesis reference looks slightly different from book or report type references.

A print thesis or dissertation
What to include in the reference:

  • Author (surname, initials)
  • (Year of publication)
  • Title
  • Name of degree award eg BSc, PhD, MSc
  • Degree-awarding body

Here are some examples of what your bibliographic references might look like:

D’Allance, V. (2012) Banking efficiencies in Russia and Brazil in context of the global financial crisis. MSc thesis. Cranfield University.

Knight, E.R.W.F. (2010) The finance of climate change: transitioning to a low carbon economy.  PhD thesis. University of Oxford.

MacKie, D.J. (2013) The effectiveness of strength-based executive coaching in enhancing transformational leadership. PsyD thesis. University of Leicester.

An online thesis or dissertation
If you have retrieved a thesis online, some additional information is required.
What to include in the reference:

  • Author (surname, initials)
  • (Year of publication)
  • Title
  • Name of degree award, e.g. BSc, PhD, MSc
  • Degree awarding body
  • Available at: URL
  • (Accessed: date)

Here are some examples of what your bibliographic references might look like:

Champniss, G. (2013) All for one and one for all: encouraging prosocial behaviours through brand-convened consumer groups. PhD thesis. Cranfield University.  Available at: http://dspace.lib.cranfield.ac.uk/handle/1826/8067.   (Accessed: 23/03/2015).

Marin-Uribe, P.L. (1995) The impact of liberalization on market structure in the European airline industry. PhD thesis. London School of Economics and Political Science.  Available at: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.307656. (Accessed: 24/03/2015).

As always if you have any questions about referencing, pop into MIRC or contact us.

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